Cape Coral is the highest rising home prices

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The very serious Real Estate section of Yahoo has brought something very interesting a couple of months ago, and a very good news for people who bought a home in Cape Coral in the past 12 months. And not only in the Cape Coral real estate but also all around, like Lehigh Acres or Fort Myers. The good news is that Cape Coral is the highest rising home prices in the U.S.!

Price differences show an increase of 12.1% for the last 12 months far ahead from Bridgeport-Stamford in Connecticut, but with still a median price of$100,000 for a typical 3 bedrooms 2 bathrooms house. But the number of foreclosure is still important with 1 foreclosure for every 92 homes. That alone will probably decrease the price rise into the single digit. It will remain steady in my opinion though because the median price is still the lowest nationwide, but steady because more and more people see a perfect place to retire when they think about the sunshine state.

Cape Coral italian style foreclosure for sale

Cape Coral italian style foreclosure for sale

The city of Cape Coral show only a 4 months’ supply of properties, which has to rise prices and demand. Lehigh Acres has only a 1 month’s supply and the rumor about how secure is the city is decreasing as well. People begin to realize that crimes in Lehigh Acres were made by A/C, pool and water system professionals in search of free parts by stealing A/C, pool equipment and water system equipment from abandoned foreclosed houses there. Those foreclosure having disappearing rapidly, those parts are no longer available and crimes rate has melted like snow under the sun.

So, this is an excellent news for our community and I really hope you bought within the last 12 months. If not, and if you still want to take the running fast train to real estate wealth, feel free to give me a call at 239-240-7346 or send me an email at info@1capecoral.com.

Here is the link to that Yahoo Real Estate article.

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Comments (0) Mar 13 2012

Do you really need a Real Estate agent to purchase a property?

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Do you think you can write an offer on a Cape Coral foreclosure for sale without the help of an agent? The answer is a big YES!

If you think about it, my guess is you want to save the typical 6% commission that we make. If it’s the case, you are completely mistaken. First, our commissions are not set to be 6%. It’s negotiable. And in the foreclosure and REO world, it’s the bank that decides how much they really want to pay. Most agents doing foreclosure make about 1 to 2% of the closed price as the seller representative. So the buyer’s agent is really doing something like 2 to 4%. In that case, if you represent yourself for that foreclosure home purchase, you’re really saving about those 2 to 4% commission.

Now, prepare yourself to get an accepted offer on that Cape Coral foreclosure house for sale. You will need a few things checked with the listing agent, and I have been in contact with most of them, they use to be very difficult if they are not in front of another agent because they think they’ll have to do all the work believing that you won’t be able to do your part:

  • What kind of paperwork do they want?  Typical is proof of funds, pre-approval letter from your bank, etc…
  • How many offers are on the property? Maybe it is a multiple offers situation already.
  • Is there a mandatory minimum MLS marketing time?
  • How do they want to receive your offer?  Fax, website or email.

So, once you have all that done, you’ll be able to put a good offer but you will need to know something important: the price. Don’t google that. You will not be able to rely on sites like Zillow or Trulia for pricing. They are not accurate. Hire an appraiser instead, especially if you do not have access to your local MLS. The point here is that you don’t want to pay too much or too little. Too much and you may overpay for the property and too little,you may lose the home to higher bidder.

You can also read this buying a foreclosure in Cape Coral post for more tips.

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Comments (0) Sep 26 2011

5 reasons why you home doesn’t sell

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If there has been no action on your residence which is for sale, chances are it is as a result of 1 or all of the factors we have listed below. If the Realtor you might have hired has not gone more than these guidelines, possibly it is time to reevaluate why your house is just not selling.

Overpriced!

This really is the most common reason for a home not selling. Unrealistic property owner objectives can cause this even with the best of Agents guidance. A Seller that will not listen to their Agent, are losing both their times if your residence is valued greater than the competition. The 1 thing you Do not need to do is overprice your residence!

The Condition

When there are numerous houses within the marketplace for sale, buyers will keep searching until they discover that ideal move-in prepared property. If your house will be the identical cost as the competition, but they’ve new kitchen/baths/carpet or hardwood floors, they will get the action. If your price may be the very same, but the competition has much more bedrooms, a lot more baths, or perhaps a finished basement, you might be giving the buyers the benefit of seeing yours and then acquiring the 1 that they are going to get more for the same money. You want to make the biggest impact on any buyer viewing your house.

Showing Times

When you have limited times when a home buyer can view your property, you are performing a dis-service to your self, the buyer and the Real estate professional who desires to obtain your house sold. We know it can be tough to show at a moments notice, but you never ever know when the proper buyer will appear. Should you can’t show it as a result of work schedules, you could wish to supply your Realtor using a important to ensure that no appointment will probably be missed. Other Agents will have a tendency to show houses when you can find not too many restrictions and they know they are able to acquire access to easy.

Net, Net, Net

That is appropriate, if your Realtor will not market your property on the net, you could not be obtaining the very best marketing and advertising value. Though all listings should be on your local MLS, your Realtor need to also have their very own web sites and other ways to promote your property online. This really is the top form of advertising your house for sale.

Location Is Nonetheless Key

It is still accurate, as far as Real Estate is concerned ~ the top locations, best schools, and curb appeal with the neighborhood is still crucial. Even so, not each and every property could be Mid-Block location, or handy to all things, and have the very best of almost everything. It is possible to make your home stand out from the crowd by enhancing your own curb appeal, generating improvements towards the interior and by pricing it lower then the rivals. We recently had a listing exactly where the backyard faced a large commercial developing. By pricing it correct and producing some small interior upgrades, ours sold as well as the 1 across the street is nonetheless in the marketplace. Make your house outshine the other people.

Also, believe about Staging your residence. Your home will stand out among the competition as a stager will showcase your home to its best advantage and this can re-force the buyers decision that your home may be the proper option.

Bear in mind, the longer an over-priced house remains on the market, the lower it’s final selling cost will probably be. Step into the buyers shoes and you will see that you wouldn’t wish to invest a lot more cash on a comparable property and you can’t anticipate others to be any diverse.

Most essential ~ listen closely to your Real estate professional. They sell homes everyday and have the experience to lead you inside the right direction for a closed sale!

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Comments (0) Aug 22 2011

To be or not to be…a landlord? That’s the question.

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I read an interesting article in the Wall Street Journal yesterday about the renting market versus the owning market. While the scene is in California, this can be very similar here in SW Florida and especially in Cape Coral and Lehigh Acres.

Agustin Gutierrez, a construction worker from this town in the hills northeast of San Francisco Bay, lost his job in 2009, then, 10 months later, he lost ownership of his home.

Now, the husband and father of 4 rents the identical five-bedroom ranch from McKinley Capital Partners, an investment company that is at the forefront of a brand new breed of big-money landlords.
McKinley, which has acquired more than 300 foreclosed single-family houses in the Bay Area over the past two years, lately teamed up with Och-Ziff Capital Management Group LLC, a new York hedge fund, with plans to buy at least 500 more foreclosed houses in the subsequent year. Those homes, too, will probably be rented to people like the Gutierrez loved ones.

Acquiring foreclosed homes as investment properties has long been dominated by mom-and-pop investors. But now hedge funds, private-equity firms, pension funds and university endowments are dipping into that market place. The attraction is double-digit returns at a time when most bonds along with other income investments yield extremely small.

Essentially the most well-liked strategy is for a large investor to team up with a neighborhood organization that scouts out houses and finds the renters. The hope would be to flip the homes within the future when prices recover.

“It’s kind of the Wall Street meets Principal Street phenomenon,” says John Burns, an Irvine, Calif.-based real-estate consultant who has discussed investing in single-family rentals with hedge funds. “The Major Street guys need to have the capital, and Wall Street requirements the expertise.”

At the finish of May possibly, 3.five million loans had been at least 90 days delinquent or in foreclosure, based on investment bank Barclays Capital. In the very same time, the country’s house ownership rate has fallen, to 65.9% inside the second quarter of 2011 from its peak of 69.2% in 2004, based on figures released by the U.S. Census Bureau final month. That drop has produced millions of new renters and helped push the vacancy rate for rental housing down by about two percentage points, to 9.2%.

“The single-family rental market is truly very large,” said Dennis McGill, director of investigation at Zelman & Associates, a study firm that follows the housing market place. “The average American says, ‘If I’ve got two kids and a dog, I can’t live in a one-bedroom apartment.’”

Zelman lately issued a report saying that in Arizona, Florida and Nevada, states hard-hit by the foreclosure crisis, the number of families renting a single-family house increased 48% from 2005 to 2010.

Huge institutional investors could eventually help stabilize the marketplace by soaking up the huge overhang of foreclosures, which could allow housing to begin healing. However, the number of single-family houses being bought by institutional investors is still small compared to the millions of distressed properties. The biggest players in the industry are deploying hundreds of millions of dollars, not the billions necessary to make a major dent.

The federal government has a significant role as well. The Obama administration is currently considering ways of selling foreclosed houses to investors who agree to rent them out. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and the Federal Housing Administration own a lot more than half of all unsold foreclosed houses.

Being a landlord can be a costly hassle for significant investors. Unlike apartment complexes, which concentrate hundreds of rental units in one place, investors must obtain hundreds of single-family houses that are miles apart, each with separate maintenance problems. Tenants can be troublesome.

“You could have a bad tenant who doesn’t want to pay their rent, or maintain the pool,” says Guy Johnson, an investor who buys foreclosed properties in Nevada, Arizona and California and rents some of them out. “A hedge fund manager doesn’t want to have to be their own plumber or electrician.”

Purchasing foreclosed properties isn’t easy either. Investors sometimes have to pay thousands of dollars in “cash for keys” payments to the previous homeowners in order to entice them to leave the property, and foreclosed homeowners often damage their houses before they are evicted.

Private-equity giant Carlyle Group LLC tried its luck with the single-family property market two years ago but abandoned the strategy late last year after concluding that the returns weren’t big enough. Carlyle’s method was different. The organization formed partnerships with nearby asset managers in California that bought and flipped houses, rather than renting them.

For now, a lot more investors are plunging into the single-family rental marketplace. McKinley, the Oakland, Calif., business that owns Mr. Gutierrez’s house, has already begun to use Och-Ziff income to purchase houses. Its model would be to acquire houses at an average price of about $100,000 apiece, put between $10,000 and $25,000 in renovations into them, and set the rental rate of the house so that it produces a return of 8% to 12% annually. This often works out to a rent of roughly $1,200 per month.

McKinley and Och-Ziff could see additional returns from selling the houses at a higher price after a few years, once the market place has improved. “Two years ago no one thought you could scale this business or that it could be institutionalized,” stated Gregor Watson, a principal with McKinley. “Now, you can get extremely good yields. It’s a quite good long-term strategy.” He declined to comment on the Och-Ziff investment. Och-Ziff also declined to comment.

Other significant investors have formed rental-housing partnerships.

G8 Capital, a private-equity fund based in Ladera Ranch, Calif., has bought 3,000 houses across the country since 2008, mostly to flip them. It decided last year to begin pursuing a hold-and-rent technique. It has since bought 250 foreclosed houses as rentals. Carrington Property Services LLC, a Santa Ana, Calif.-based property investment business that manages about 4,500 houses nationally, is in talks with investors to raise funds for a real-estate investment trust, to be called Residential National Trust, which would acquire foreclosed houses for rental. The company plans to purchase as many as five,000 far more rental homes in markets including Chicago, Miami, Phoenix and Las Vegas.

Waypoint Genuine Estate Group, an Oakland, Calif.-based firm, has bought 700 houses within the past two years as rental properties. Doug Brien, a former place kicker for the New York Jets who is now managing director of Waypoint, says that his company has approached pension funds, university endowments and big private investment groups about investing in his fund. In July, he says he closed on a financing deal from an Ivy League university endowment, but declined to name the university.

“At some point, there is going to be a shortage of housing,” Mr. Brien mentioned. “Everyone is realizing that single-family buy-and-hold is the way to go.”

In November, hedge fund manager William Ackman’s Pershing Square Capital Management LP released a report arguing that single-family rental properties are an “under-owned asset class” that would make “an intelligent investment for institutional investors.” Pershing Square predicted that investing in single-family houses and holding them as rentals for 10 years could produce double-digit investment returns, even if U.S. residence costs only improved marginally.

All the activity is fueling a renewed debate over whether investors are good or bad for the housing industry. In the early days of the housing bust, some community groups discouraged banks from selling foreclosed houses to investors for fear they wouldn’t take proper care of the properties. Some communities riddled with foreclosed houses became slums.

Alan Mallach, a senior fellow with the Brookings Institution in Washington, argues that instead of running from investors, local governments should provide subsidies to investors who buy, rent out and are good landlords for foreclosed properties. “If a neighborhood has a high rate of residence ownership, that’s obviously better,” he stated. “But in some markets, there was so much inventory coming on the market place that the sheer number of properties was destabilizing those markets.”

Mr. Gutierrez, the Vallejo construction worker, now pays $1,800 a month in rent, compared to the $2,500 per month he was paying to cover the cost of his mortgage when he owned the house. He says it bothers him that he no longer owns his property, but is happy to pay less and says his new landlords are good property managers.

He bought the house in 2003 for $340,000 using a $322,700 loan. He refinanced the house 5 times, driving up the total amount of debt on the house to $400,000. He lost the house to foreclosure in 2009. McKinley paid about $155,000 for the house that year.

“It’s confusing, because sometimes I think it’s my house, but I have to remind myself that it’s not,” mentioned Mr. Gutierrez, who says he doesn’t plan to try to repurchase the house. “It’s sad, but it’s what happened to a lot of men and women.”

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Comments (0) Aug 06 2011

Investors: what you should do during a BPO.

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Once you have sent your offer of 55% of the lowest average comparable and deducting for any repairs to the bank, the bank is going to hire a third party company to have a look at the property that is being discounted or what it is called a short sale transaction.

The following steps are what you have to consider to have a successful outcome from that third party that is doing the BPO/Appraisal.

Make yourself the contact person for the process.
When the third party company that is calling you to schedule an appointment, you want to make sure that the person on the phone knows the fact that this property is been foreclosed and do they know that it has a contract to be sold. Most of the people just want to come out and take pictures and run to the next one. They are in it to get as many done in a day as possible because they are getting paid minimal money to do this task, most of them being Real Estate agent that are not producing enough for a living. Build a rapport with them right out of the door and ask them a few questions while you have them on the phone. For examples:

Do you know that the bank is looking for a quick sale value on this home?

How long have you been doing BPO/Appraisals?
As you are listening, you are on a mission to gain information. You will be able to use this information to give you more details on how to proceed with this particular person before meeting them at the property.

How many of these inspections are you doing a day?
How many have you done in the last month/last week? And so on…

What is the name of your company/Phone #/Fax #/cell phone#?
So you can contact them ahead of time to confirm your meeting when set.
I also call some of them time to time for tips about new foreclosures.

If it is a Realtor, ask if they do a lot of REO’s.
This is a bank foreclosed home that Realtor’s like to list after they have been foreclosed on. You want to be sure on this because it will help you know how to proceed in handling the person in the field.

If it is an appraisal you are going to
You want to know this as well because an appraisal will be a little longer than a BPO. They are going to measure the property just like they did when it was purchased. They will do the size of bedrooms, how many rooms, all interior pictures, front and back pictures of the house and more…

Compiling all the right paperwork to take to the meeting at the house consist of the following:

A folder that has all information about the property
Write in big “Foreclosure” and “Working with banks and sellers to liquidate properties” on the front of the folder.

A copy of the purchase and sale agreement
You sent it to the loss mitigation department. It should be completed and executed in a time frame of 30 days or less.

A hardship letter
The hardship letter we were talking about here from the seller explaining why they are losing their home.

A repair estimate of the house
All documents supporting the value that is being offered. Made you homework here. You’ll get better at it with experience though.

Low comparable from the property
Get you comps from Real Estate agents, MLS and so on. Get the lowest 3 similar LISTED and 3 SOLD properties. The keyword is lowest here!

Articles from newspaper or online articles
Try to get newspaper articles explaining the down turn of the market or any problem of the area where the property is located. Check online local newspaper as well.

Copy of the building sketch of the property
If it is an appraisal, supply the appraiser with a copy of the building sketch of the property. This will put a smile on the appraiser face because it helps them get their job done sooner. This move will instantly put yourself as knowledgeable and therefore, your numbers as much more accurate, even if you may be a bit low :-)

The day when you are meeting them at the property
Make sure you call and confirm they are going to be on time. Be professional.

Arrive early so you have a chance to get a feel of the house
Drive by the neighborhood and look for any signs in yards. Take them down if any and remove any flyer/advertising you may have at the house. You do not want them to know what you are marketing it for. Look around the house for any new damages or negatives to point out.

When the agent gets there
DO NOT HAND them the package you have. Lay it down somewhere visible in the house (kitchen counter or on bar). Start building a rapport with them. Have a conversation about anything, something in common (have a quick look at his/her car bumper sticker. You most probably see something he/she like to talk about: pets, football team, etc…). Ask how they are doing and get a little personal.

Do not start bashing the house
As if you want a low value, it is important though that you don’t bash the property. Let them in and walk the house showing them around from behind them. That will let you read their body language. Do not get up in their face. Be nice and have a sense of humor about the meeting and that you two are in this together.

The Big Question!!
When the agent/appraiser asks who you are in this process, whenever this comes up, either on the phone in the beginning or on the way there when you are confirming the appointment, DO NOT LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE AN INVESTOR. You are just the person meeting them there to show them the house. Minimize yourself. If they ask you if you are the listing agent or the Realtor® and you are not, let them know that our company works with the seller and the bank to liquidate the property. If you are a Realtor® then answer yes I am a Realtor® but working to help the seller.

What should I wear to this meeting?
Try not to over dress or look like you are better, smarter or know more than they do. Play at their level or below. Allow them to be in control or at least think they are in control (better results). Ask them if there is anything else that they need. Include a couple of newbie’s questions about their field. Leave an impression that you know he/she is the professional here.

Getting the package in their hand.
Talk a little about the market and show them things that need repair along the way. However, be helpful not forceful. When you pass by the package pick it up and let them know you have a copy anyway. Inform them that it contains info like comps, the current purchase agreement, etc… You don’t have to tell them everything in it because they can see it for themselves. You want them to ask you for it. Let it be their idea of getting it instead of it seeming like you are forcing it in their face, you must take this type of approach.

What do you think of the value?
After the meeting, hint around about the value. “What do you think the value will come in at?” “Ballpark figure”. Come across with the seller needs to sell attitude rather than they want to sell. If the agent/appraiser will tell, that is okay.

Can I follow up with you?
Have either yourself or someone else follow up with them 24 hours after the value was done. Thank them for coming out, be polite and ask them if they have completed the value and sent it in to the bank.

Calling 24 hours later.
Start out asking them how it is going. Then ask them if they have completed any more inspections since the one they did with you. By this time you should have an idea of how well they are going to respond. Just ask what they thought the value came in at and did the value come in around the contract price.

After that, call the bank and ask if they have received the value and can they accept the offer that you have submitted. If not, ask them to call you back with the approval as soon as they get it.

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Comments (1) Dec 27 2009

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